How To: 4th of July Firework Paint Printing Activity

by Lucy Baker July 03, 2017 3 min read

How To: 4th of July Firework Paint Printing Activity

Why not get your little ones involved in the 4th of July celebrations by enjoying some firework art using paints and building blocks!? This activity provides a great play based learning link to learning about symmetry.

Did you know that building blocks aren't just for building with? There are so many cool ways to use them that help to support your child's sensory development, creativity and fine motor skills. In this 4th of July Firework Paint Printing activity you can get the whole family involved and Make Time Together to create some explosive building block art.

What you need:

  • Creative QT Peel 'n Stick Building Block Baseplates (10" x 10" 2 pack Blue)
  • Selection of building blocks (we used LEGO®)
  • Acrylic paints (same colors as building blocks)
  • Paint palette
  • Cardstock (we co-ordinated colors with our blue baseplates but you don't have to)

How it Works:

The great thing about this activity is that it can be adapted to suit so many different age and ability levels. We decided to take it a step further to try and link in some play based learning about symmetry, but please don't feel intimidated by this. If all your child wants to do is create chaotic firework prints, then don't stop them! Let them use their imagination to light up their page. There is absolutely no right or wrong way to go about this.

The first stage is to use your Peel 'n Stick Baseplates and building blocks to make a firework scene. This can look however you want it to. With my toddler, I decided to start him off by putting the black and orange firework base on the baseplate for him. I asked him to add some firework sparks on the left side of the baseplate using whichever building blocks he wanted. As he did this I copied his pattern on the right hand side of the baseplate. As we progressed I explained to him the concept of symmetry in very simple terms. He really enjoyed being the leader and Mommy having to copy his pattern. It isn't often he gets to boss Mommy about!

Once you have your firework scene all set, you can get to work on the paint printing. To offer my toddler some guidance, I started him off by printing the firework base with black and orange paint.

To create the prints help your child dip the block generously in the paint and then push down firmly on all sides onto the card. Try and encourage them to do a 'push down and pull up' motion to avoid smudging. No worries if it smudges... there are always wild sparks flying at firework shows!

With my son, we repeated the same process where he did the left hand side and I did the right hand side in a symmetrical manner. The printing process is such a good way to get those little fingers working and to encourage fine motor development. Of course, if your child prefers they can always use the stud side of the building block to make circular firework sparks.

As previously mentioned, there are so many ways that you can vary this activity to make it beneficial for your child. It might work better to do the paint printing first and for you to then try and build the scene on the baseplate. If your child is much younger you can always limit the number of blocks they use or use bigger building blocks. On our second attempt my toddler chose a much simpler pattern to create on the baseplate using only two colors and two size variations of blocks. He found this much more manageable.

We hope you manage to take a break from the celebrations to spend some family time making this fun art project. Happy Independence Day and we hope that your holiday really does sparkle!

...

Creative QT designs quality + innovative toys that declutter homes and inspire creative play. Founded by parents of five, Adam and Dana Sue Hinkle, Creative QT’s vision is to empower parents and encourage a culture of families that Make Time Together. All products are designed to enrich families’ lives through active, creative play and play based learning. Creative QT products are laboratory tested for compliance with CPSC requirements and are free of lead, cadmium and phthalates so you can play with confidence. So, go ahead … today is the day: be your kid’s hero.

"LEGO®is a trademark of the LEGO Group of companies which does not sponsor, authorize or endorse this site."

Lucy Baker
Lucy Baker


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